• Pediatric Consultants

Fruits & Vegetables for Better Health


Why Fruits and Vegetables?

Fruits and veggies are nutrient rich, which helps keep you healthy and energized.

Fruits and veggies are rich in vitamins, minerals, fiber, and antioxidants that help to reduce the risk of many diseases, including heart disease, high blood pressure, and some cancers.

What Your Family Can Do:

Eat a variety of colorful fruits and veggies each day.

Try crunchy veggies, raw or lightly steamed.

Cut up veggies and serve with a low fat dip or hummus for a healthy snack.

Try all forms of fruits and veggies.

Fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and 100% juice.

Canned veggies or fruits packed in water are best to reduce calories, salt, and sugar.

Add fruits and veggies to your favorite foods.

Shred carrots or zucchini into meatloaf, casseroles, or muffins.

Add veggies to an omelet or scrambled eggs.

Top off pizza with fresh veggies.

Mix up a salad with leafy greens, and other veggies and fruits.

Apples, pears, and raisins (to name a few) can add flavor and boost nutrition for your salad.

Quick Tips

Fresh, frozen, canned, and dried fruits and veggies can all count toward a serving

Eat a rainbow of colors when eating fruits and vegetables

Red: tomatoes, strawberries, apples, etc.

Orange/Yellow: carrots, oranges, peaches, pineapple, etc.

Green: green beans, kiwi, green apples, spinach, lettuce, etc.

Blue/Purple: raisins, blueberries, plums, eggplant, etc.

White: cauliflower, bananas, mushrooms, etc.

For More Information

www.kidshealth.org/parent

www.americanheart.gov

www.dole5aday.com

www.fruitsandveggiesmatter.gov

www.teamnutrition.usda.gov/library

Information provided adapted from www.dole5aday.com, www.mypyramid.gov, www.5aday.gov, www.nci.gov, www.eatright.org, www.cdc.gov, www.hhs.gov, www.usda.gov, and NCH handouts.

#healthtopics

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